The Plough

A Podcast about Great Music.

Episode 9: Then Play On

Rohan and Chris delve into one of the great albums of the early incarnation of Fleetwood Mac, led by Peter Green, and also featuring Danny Kirwan, John McVie, Mick Fleetwood, and mysteriously not much of the band’s other member, Jeremy Spencer. Then Play On was released in September 1969, and it was the last album that this version of the band would make. Within months, Peter Green had left the group to pursue other other musical (and spiritual) endeavours, and Spencer wouldn’t be far behind, setting the band on course through a few more new versions and new members,(including Christine Perfect, soon to become Christine McVie) before finally arriving at the 1970s juggernaut version of the band featuring Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham. This early version of Fleetwood Mac was no less incendiary, and this album is an intriguing indication of the creative capabilities of a pretty spectacular group of musicians. It’s quite unlike anything else, so we hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

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Episode 8: The Lost Album

This episode Rohan and Chris review one of the greatest least-heard records ever made, Lewis Taylor's The Lost Album (2005). Lewis Taylor was an English artist who taste major success in the 1990s with his first two albums, Lewis Taylor (1996), and Lewis II (2000). Somewhere in between those two releases though, he made what we think is the best album of his career, but the sessions were shelved and it didn't end up being released until he moved to a new label nearly 10 years later. To compound things and add to the mystery, shortly after it was finally released, he decided he didn't want to be a part of the music business at all, and withdrew from the spotlight in the midst of a US promotional tour. He hasn't released any music since and doesn't have a website. Nonetheless, all of the music he did release is still out there to be heard and it's still remarkable to this day.

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Episode 7: Let England Shake

This episode focuses on a record that garnered much acclaim and accolades when it was first released, and rightly so. One might say this is going against the grain of what we do at The Plough: unearthing 'hidden' gems. Yet despite the accolades, for the most part it escaped a lot of the wider public's attention - at least those that weren't focused on the music press. Produced by Mick Harvey and recorded in a church in Dorset, this is a complex, abstract, and hard-hitting album, but ultimately one of the best artistic statements of the last decade. Rohan and Chris have a great time unpacking it, and are very moved in the process.

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Apologies also for the occasional glitch in recording quality on this particular podcast too: gremlins in the system. 

Episode 6a: The Plough in the Field with Roger Grierson

We've got something a little special here, folks. This podcast is kind of an addendum to our last podcast about The Axeman's Jazz by The Beasts of Bourbon. We were lucky enough to be able to sit down with manager/promoter/music industry guy Roger Grierson, who was intimately involved in the making of the record and the management of The Beasts from that time. We had a chat to try and get behind a few more of the stories and details surrounding the band and the recording. Enjoy! 

Episode 6: The Axeman's Jazz

This episode focuses on a seminal (there's that word again) album in Australian Indie Rock history - The Beasts of Bourbon's debut record The Axeman's Jazz from 1984. Featuring the talents of Tex Perkins, Kim Salmon, Spencer P. Jones, James Baker, and Boris Sudjovic, and engineered by Tony Cohen, this album's legend has only grown since its release. Listen to Rohan and Chris be inspired, be amazed, revel in the folklore of Australian Rock'n'Roll, and have a good time in the process.

Episode 5: Reading, Writing And Arithmetic

In this episode, Rohan and Chris discuss The Sundays' 1990 album Reading, Writing And Arithmetic. Chris talks a lot about how time, place and personal feelings influence the way we listen to or appreciate music, and Rohan has a thing or two to say about it as well. 

The Plough © 2015

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